Archive for August 2016

Five Minutes With Mark Dapin

Five Minutes With Mark Dapin

Mark Dapin is a man who wears many hats. He’s been a magazine editor for publications such as Ralph and the Australian Financial Review and a regular columnist for the Good Weekend magazine. He is also a writer of fiction and non fiction books. His novel King of the Cross won the 2010 Ned Kelly award for best first fiction and his 2012 novel Spirit House was longlisted for the Miles Franklin award. His recent works have a very different flavour as Mark explores the impact of war.

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Mark is joining us at the 2016 Batemans Bay Writers Festival where we will have a chance to hear him talk about war, politics and the importance of the arts.

You’re currently completing your PhD at ADFA. You’ve written and edited several books around the impact of war. Most of us think of you as a pretty knockabout funny bloke. Where does such a serious passion come from?

I never intended to be a “funny” writer. At first, I was surprised people thought my stories were funny because they were often just descriptions of the world as it looked to me. I was a serious journalist (of a sort) before I began to write first-person humour columns, and real journalism was always more important to me. That said, I like my serious work to surprise the reader with moments of (inappropriate) humour. As for the war thing, I’m not sure how that came about. I think I just got old and boring and interested in military history, in the way that old and boring men do.

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The Vietnam War has been the subject  of both a fiction and a nonfiction books for you,  R&R and The Nasho’s War respectively. What is it about that particular conflict that makes you put pen to paper?

R&R came out of my research for the Nashos’ War. I just wanted to make sure that some of the ideas I could not use in non-fiction (because they weren’t true) did not go to waste. I wrote my novel Spirit House about the Burma Railway. I considered using the research for Spirit House to write a non-fiction book – and as the basis for a PhD – so it could have gone either way, I suppose.

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You’re a journalist by trade, when you’re not writing books, your teaching others how to write them. Why is teaching about writing important to you?

I enjoy it. I like the sound of my own voice – except on tape, of course. Also, I like the idea of helping people, My life can seem a bit selfish at times.

You’ve interviewed some pretty cool celebrities in your time, from Nick Cave to Lee Kernaghan to Frederick Forsyth. Any funny stories to share?

Kostya Tszyu once punched me and broke my rib. But I’ll save the other stories for the festival.

We’re looking forward to welcoming you at the 2016 Batemans Bay Festival. We’ve got you chatting about everything from life after war to the state of Australian politics to the state of the arts. What are you most looking forward to at the Festival?

Hearing myself speak. Selling and signing loads of books. Eating stuff.

You can meet Mark at the following events:

Saturday September 10 11.45 am to 12.45 pm

State of the Arts

Geoff Cousins, Annabel Morley and Sarah Rice have a wealth of experience in the arts sector. They explore how the arts can remain a vital and relevant expression of our many identities. Facilitated by Mark Dapin

Saturday September 10 1.45 pm to 2.45 pm

Keeping the Bastards Honest: the 2016 election in review

Join political and economics commentator George Megalogenis, and journalists Mark Dapin and Malcolm Knox as they reveal the horrors and humour of the 2016 campaign and what questions this latest shuffling of the deck chairs raises for the immediate future.

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Saturday September 10 4.30 pm to 5.30 pm

Life after War

Authors Mark Dapin (R&R and The Nashos’ War) and Leah Kaminsky (The Waiting Room) have written about the impact of war and how the effect of war crosses generations and affects lives long after the conflict itself is over. Facilitated by Suzanne Leal, a lawyer experienced in child protection, criminal law and refugee law.

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Help with purchasing tickets

Help with purchasing Platinum tickets

Remember, Platinum ticket-holders can come to 9 sessions, and the opening event is free as are any of the workshops. The literary lunch is $40 instead of $60.

You will need to go to the Festival website twice:

  • firstly to purchase and pay for your platinum ticket
  • secondly to book your preferred sessions

1) Buy your ticket

  • hit the Festival Platinum button under Get Tickets on the Festival home page.

This takes you to the Eventbrite ticket page.

  • Hit the green Tickets button
  • A drop-down menu comes up saying ‘Select Tickets’.
  • enter the number of Platinum tickets you want to buy
  • Hit the green Get Tickets button

Your initial confirmation ticket/s will be emailed to you.

Within a day or so you will be re-emailed your ticket(s), with a three digit promotional code included, for booking your preferred sessions: ‘Your personal Lunch and Discount Code: xxx’

2) Ready to book your preferred sessions:

  • hit the BBWF Get Session Tickets button under Get Tickets on the Festival home page.

This takes you to the Eventbrite ticket page.

  • Hit the green Tickets button
  • A drop-down menu comes up saying ‘Select Tickets’. At the top of that menu is a link saying ‘Enter promotional code’.
  • Enter your three digit code and hit the Apply Code button
  • top left of the drop-down menu will say: ‘xxx applied. A 100% discount is available’. (You have already paid for your ticket/s)
  • Hit the green Get Tickets button
  • book your preferred sessions
  • agree to the waiver
  • hit Complete registration

If you are booking for the Literary Lunch with Tim Fischer AC as well, you will need to go back to the festival website

  • hit the Literary Lunch button under Get Tickets on the Festival home page.

This takes you to the Eventbrite ticket page.

  • Hit the green Tickets button
  • A drop-down menu comes up saying ‘Select Tickets’.

At the top of that menu is a link saying ‘Enter promotional code’.

  • Enter your three digit code and hit the Apply Code button

Once the code has been entered, and your seats booked, hit ‘checkout’ to see that the total order is $40.

Still need help? email batemansbaywritersfestival@gmail.com

Bring your tickets, grab your book-spending money, pack your reading glasses and enjoy the Festival. What better way to spend a Spring weekend.

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Highlight opening event

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Festival Program for you to download

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Five minutes with Deb Hunt

Five Minutes with Deb Hunt

English born Deb Hunt has been a librarian, teacher, event manager, PR executive, actress and journalist. She has worked with Shakespeare in the Park in London, Australian House & Garden magazine in Sydney and for the past five years as a writer with the Royal Flying Doctor Service. Her memoir,  Love in the Outback, reveals Deb’s experience of discovering an unimagined land and true love far from the green fields of home.  Her latest book, Australian Farming Families explores what it is that binds Australians to the land. Travelling tens of thousands of kilometres, Deb met farming families who are challenged every day by the weather, economic ups and downs and isolation and yet remain passionate and determined.

Deb is joining us at the 2016 Batemans Bay Writers Festival in September. We spent five minutes with Deb to find out a little more about her.

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The summary of your 2014 memoir, Love in the Outback, goes along these lines: “The true story of a tree-hugging vegetarian from a small English village who gave up a job she hated, stopped stalking a man who wasn’t interested and moved to Australia to work for the Royal Flying Doctor Service.”  What were some of the culture shock moments in that transition that make you laugh now?

I had so much to learn about the Outback. A single property in Australia can be the size of several English counties so it can take a couple of hours to drive across. I could never admit that I used to stop for a nap mid-way through a two-hour drive in England. That was considered a long way! I remember one time I found a mouse at home in Broken Hill so I captured it, thinking I might keep it as a pet or maybe release it. Then I heard about an epic plague of mice causing havoc in town, so I kept very quiet about the one I’d tried to save. And until I lived in Broken Hill I’d never heard of anyone having all their teeth removed when they got married. Apparently it saves having to visit a dentist.

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Before you came to Australia, did you have any idea of what the RFDS was and how important it was to outback life?

My only understanding of the RFDS was through watching that old TV series about the Flying Doctor from the 1970s and I’ve learnt so much since about the incredible work they do. I fully appreciate that tyranny of distance now, which is an ever-present threat in the Outback. I had no idea how vital the service is for survival in rural and remote areas.

Your experiences in rural Australia have also led to a collection of true stories called Australian Farming Families. Is it possible to sum up what you learned from them about life on the land?

I learnt it takes grit and determination to be a farmer in Australia. It’s not a question of if disaster strike, it’s when. Farmers, graziers and pastoralists cope with drought, fire, flood, debt, disease and the invasion of pests on a regular basis. Add to that the lack of schools, hospitals, dentists, libraries, shops, mechanics and all the other services the rest of us take for granted and you begin to understand how hard it is to operate in a remote area. Yet the people I interviewed wouldn’t live anywhere else; they’re passionate about what they do.

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Where to next with your writing? Are you sticking with non-fiction or is there a novel lurking in there?

I love non-fiction but I’ve always been an avid reader of fiction so right now I’m exploring an idea for a novel – set in the Outback of course!

We’re so looking forward to welcoming you to the 2016 Batemans Bay Writers Festival. But what are you looking forward to when you visit in September?

You’ve got a great line-up of speakers so I’m looking forward to hearing as many as I can. Tim Fischer was influential during his time as Chairman of the RFDS so I’m really looking forward to hearing what he’s got to say. And I’ve heard the coastline around Bateman’s Bay is spectacular.

Meet Deb at the following events:

Saturday September 10: Time 3 pm to 4 pm

The Royal Flying Doctor Service & Outback Life

Deb Hunt (Love in the Outback and Australian Farming Families) talks with Ian Campbell about the important role the RFDS plays on outback life.

Saturday September 10: Time 5.30 pm for 6pm to 7 pm

Free event

4 X 5 minutes

Four authors, four readings, four sets of literary trivia. Join us for drinks, trivia and book-readings. Authors Deb Hunt, Meredith Jaffé, Paul Hetherington and Rod Jones, give short readings from a work of their choice. In between, tease your brain with four sets of literary trivia. Prizes to be won.

Sunday September 11: Time: 9.30 am to 10.30 am

Memoir: Telling true stories

How does a writer distinguish memory from fact or determine truths long buried with their teller? Author Meredith Jaffé facilitates a lively discussion with Annabel Morley, Deb Hunt and Rod Jones.

 

 

 

Book lovers! Give the Festival a go!

BATEMANS BAY WRITERS FESTIVAL 9 to 11 September 2016

A festival for book lovers, budding writers, authors and readers

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We are thrilled to announce an exciting line up for the 2016 Festival. If you haven’t been to a festival before, then give it a go! You will be sure to enjoy the weekend, and if you can’t make it to the whole weekend, then there will certainly be some individual sessions which will appeal.

The Festival opens on Friday 9 September with the Honourable Tim Fisher AC talking: Tango in Travel and Travel Writing ― Bhutan to Batemans Bay!

Special guest and former Australian polititian Tim Fischer celebrates as he shows the number 10 in Alice Springs during The Ghan 10th anniversary trip from Adelaide to Darwin.

Special guest and former Australian politician Tim Fischer celebrates as he shows the number 10 in Alice Springs during The Ghan 10th anniversary trip from Adelaide to Darwin.

His talk is followed by a fun debate: Pictures Speak Louder Than Words moderated by Paul Brunton

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Buy a Platinum Pass ticket and this session is free.

There are sixteen sessions for book lovers over the weekend as well as five workshops. Here are some of the highlights.

  • For foodies, meet James Viles chef and owner of the two-hatted restaurant Biota Dining, and photographer Simon Griffiths who has worked with celebrated chefs including Maggie Beer and Kylie Kwong. They are joined by Annabel Morley, daughter of the renowned actor Robert Morley CBE. Annabel’s memoir is The Icing on the Cake.
  • Lovers of art cannot miss hearing Darleen Bungey in conversation with Paul Brunton about her biographies of John Olsen and Arthur Boyd.
  • Dr Leah Kaminsky has written the fascinating We’re All Going to Die, a book that asks why some of us fear dying and others embrace it.
  • Award winning journalists George Megalogenis, Malcolm Knox and Mark Dapin discuss the horror and humour of the 2016 election.
  • For lovers of fiction there’s Malcolm Knox author of The Wonder Lover chatting with Ian Campbell.
  • Award winning poets, Sarah Rice, Geoff Page and Paul Hetherington discuss rhythm and rhyme and read from their poems.
  • Deb Hunt talks about her books and the Royal Flying Doctor Service.

The festival closes with a Literary Lunch featuring Tim Fischer talking about Turning Points in our Great Country. We are in for a treat! And it all happens at the CoachHouse Marina Resort, Beach Road, Batemans Bay.

Bookings are open for all sessions including the Opening Night event, Platinum Pass tickets, individual sessions and the Literary Lunch.

For more information and to purchase your tickets: www.batemansbaywritersfestival.com or phone 0417 267 771

Marion Roubos-Bennett, Festival Director